Camille A. Brown: A visual history of social dance in 25 moves

Lovely (only 4 minutes) TED Studio Talk with
Camille A. Brown, Choreographer and educator
Camille A. Brown leads her dance company through excavations of ancestral stories, both timeless and traditional, that connect history with contemporary culture. Full bio
Why do we dance? African-American social dances started as a way for enslaved Africans to keep cultural traditions alive and retain a sense of inner freedom. They remain an affirmation of identity and independence. In this electric demonstration, packed with live performances, choreographer, educator and TED Fellow Camille A. Brown explores what happens when communities let loose and express themselves by dancing together.
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climate change and bird migration

Chip Thomas is up to mo’ good in New Mexico. The art of climate change together with the dance of bird migration. All around awesome.

jetsonorama

If one were to google “…what is the impact of climate change on bird migration,” one of the first links that comes up is a page by World Migratory Bird Day 2007.    It seems this organization formed in 2007 to bring light to the issue of climate change on bird migration, had their day then dissolved.  However, they created a fact page with 5 immediate changes to migratory birds as a result of climate change.  One of the first things they identify is this…

“One of the major effects of climate change is the loss of habitats. The habitats migratory birds depend on are in danger to change and to disappear due to increasing temperatures, flooding or desertification. Coastal wetland areas that migrating birds use for nesting and foraging are an example. During their migration, birds rely on these areas to provide food and resting places. There they can…

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Learning From Data: An Intiguing Link between Police Shootings and Black Voter Registration

To understand how black Americans are impacted by fatal police shootings in each state, we defined an “over-representation ratio”: the percentage of fatal police shootings in which a black American was killed divided by percentage of black Americans in a state. The number one determinant of over-representation in fatal police shootings is the percentage of eligible black Americans registered to vote.

WIRED/MAIMUNA SHAHNAZ MAJUMDER

I found a very interesting piece in Wired Magazine, demonstrating a link between police shootings and voter registration, written by an equally interesting person.  I encourage you to read more about Maia Majumder and her article.

aaeaaqaaaaaaaahxaaaajdiwndc5yzixltyxztitndy4my05mdm2lwnlyjy3zju2ntmwzgMaimuna (Maia) Majumder is an Engineering Systems PhD candidate at MIT and computational epidemiology research fellow at HealthMap. Before coming to MIT, she earned a Bachelors of Science in Engineering Science and a Masters of Public Health in Epidemiology and Biostatistics at Tufts University. Her research interests involve probabilistic modeling, Bayesian statistics, and “systems epidemiology” in the context of emerging infectious diseases. She also enjoys exploring novel techniques for data procurement, writing about data for the general public, and creating meaningful data visualizations. When taking a break from work, Maia moonlights as a jazz vocalist, budding chef, and primal wellness enthusiast who loves Bikram yoga, Zumba, & lifting heavy objects with her awesome husband, Imran Malek.

An Intriguing Link Between Police Shootings and Black Voter Registration

Since January 1, 2016, there have been 714 fatal police shootings in the United States. That comes to 79 deaths a month, 18 a week, and three a day. For context, the US recorded 43 cases of locally transmitted Zika virus and 25 deaths from West Nile in the same time frame.

For most, if not all, public health issues, some segments of the population are more vulnerable than others. Americans who engage in unprotected sex are more likely to contract Zika virus, while older people are more likely to die from West Nile.

Read the full article here


 

 

A Good Ada Lovelace Day to All…

..And to all a good Ada Lovelace Day; Just a quick note: Lovelace (Died Nov 1852 aged 36(#foreveryoung)) was the mother of computing, or rather, she saw(and shared) what she reckoned Babbage’s baby computer(analytical machine) might grow up to be. So what profund stupidity that the high tech industry, and our society at large, so devalues work(e.g. code) if it comes from somone who is not rocking XY chromosomes

Vice’s Motherboard has some great posts, check em out if’n yer still curious

Ada Lovelace Was the First Person to Understand the Real Potential of Computers

WRITTEN BY VICTORIA TURK
Elon Musk Follows Zero Women on Twitter (Update)

Written by SARAH JEONG

 

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