Taylor Mac’s Wild and Beautifully Absurd, 24 Hour, History of America. Audience Participation Required.

It took a while for the magnitude of Taylor Mac’s new show to sink into my understanding all the way out here in Arizona.  There was an article in the NY Times this past weekend, but I skimmed through it and thought it odd what New Yorkers find entertaining.  Then, as oftentimes happens, I was listening to NPR in the car and caught this segment on All Things Considered.  Thanks NPR, I would have missed the significance without you.

A 24-Decade History of Popular Music will happen coincidentally, on my birthday, October 8th, at St. Ann’s Warehouse in Brooklyn.  Taylor Mac will be delivering the most raucous, unusual and compelling combination of so many things, I’m sure it will be a memory of a lifetime for anyone hardy enough to stay the course of the 24 hour performance.

Read and listen yourself!

 

 

 

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At the Tonys, Moments to Remember

Photo, from left: Renée Elise Goldsberry, Leslie Odom Jr., Cynthia Erivo and Daveed Diggs.CreditSara Krulwich/The New York Times 

In a Tony Awards night shadowed by the tragedy in Orlando, Fla., prizewinners and other performers worked hard to strike a balance between joy and reflection. Here are some moments to remember:

The Hardest-Working Man in Showbiz

Soon after delivering a tremulous speech addressed to the TV audience (“Hate will never win”), the Tonys host, James Corden, dove into a breathless mash-up of 20 Broadway hits, concluding with some elegant hoofing to “We’re in the Money” from “42nd Street.”

#TonysSoDiverse

“Think of tonight as the Oscars, but with diversity,” Mr. Corden joked in his opening monologue. And the show delivered: In a first for Broadway, Tony voters gave the four musical performance awards to black actors: Cynthia Erivo of “The Color Purple” and Leslie Odom Jr., Renée Elise Goldsberry and Daveed Diggs of “Hamilton.”

Lin-Manuel Miranda’s Sonnet

Lin-Manuel Miranda accepted the award for best score for “Hamilton” at the Tony Awards with a sonnet addressing his wife, Vanessa Nadal, as well as the shooting in Orlando, Fla.

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/video/players/offsite/index.html?videoId=100000004467857

A Poem for the Moment

In his acceptance speech for best score for “Hamilton,” Lin-Manuel Miranda provided the broadcast’s emotional high point, reading a sonnet he had written that cited “senseless acts of tragedy” and included the repeated “and love is love, is love, is love, is love” that brought down the house.

Asked later why he decided to address the situation this way, he said: “We live in this world where beautiful and horrible things exist at the same time. You can’t let that go by, particularly when theater doesn’t exist without the L.G.B.T. community.”

Read more of the NY Times article here.