Photography Exhibit @ PAM

http://www.phxart.org/exhibition/ffbb

What is still life? Although at its most basic still life is an assemblage of inanimate objects, historically the term refers to artworks that engage with concepts of achievement, ephemerality, and mortality. They rely on symbolic objects to suggest impermanence: flowers, fruit, books, bones. The English term “still life” contrasts with the French term for the same genre, nature morte, literally “dead nature.”

Unlike paintings, which are primarily intended as artworks, a still life photograph may originally have been made for another purpose. In Flowers, Fruits, Books, Bones: Still Life from the Center for Creative Photography, the exhibition features photographs initially made as descriptive documents intended for a range of uses, from advertisements to teaching aids. Regardless of intention, the exhibition explores how photographers use the characteristics of the medium such as focus, abrupt framing, and detailed description to extract, isolate, and describe their subjects. They direct our attention to shapes, textures, details, edges, colors, negative spaces, shadows, and unexpected angles.

A more common genre in paintings, the exhibition includes paintings from Phoenix Art Museum’s collection, inviting viewers to examine the ways photographers have approached the still life genre as compared to their painter counterparts.

Each of the works invite the viewer to slow down, to leave our normal lives behind, if only for a moment, and lavish our attention on each of these unique objects. For a moment, in the gallery, all motion, all life, is stilled.

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CESAR CHAVEZ FILM NIGHT

When Wednesday, April 27, 2016, 5 – 8:30 p.m.
Where SU-104E
MEChA will be hosting a special screening of the documentary Harvest of the Empire: A History of Latinos in America in honor of Cesar Chavez’s birthday this month.

On Campus, Glendale Community College 4/27/16

 

gcc_gaucho

RESEARCH METHODS STUDENT POSTER SESSION

Wednesday, April 27, 2016, 10:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. SU-100B (by coffee bar)

Student researchers in the Research Methods in Psychology classes will present the results of their experiments at this poster session. Students worked all semester long to design and conduct their projects, and they hope you join us to learn about their findings and implications. Both animal-model (LongEvans rats) and human-model research will be presented.

 

FAFSA WORKSHOP

Wednesday, April 27, 2016, 12 – 2 p.m. B-104

Assisting student with FAFSA applications online.

 

TEST TAKING SKILLS

Wednesday, April 27, 2016, 1 – 2 p.m. B-207

 

 

DÍA DE LOS NIÑOS CELEBRATION

When Tuesday, April 26, 2016, 9 a.m. – 2 p.m.
Where Central Mall
El dÍa de los NiÑos/El dÍa de los Libros (Day of the Child/Day of the Book) is a celebration based on childhood and literacy that began in 1997. Borrowing from the traditional Mexican holiday “El dÍa de los NiÑos,” the American version expanded to include literacy when acclaimed author Pat Mora took up the cause in 1997. A year later, the U.S. Congress officially designated April 30 as “Day of the Child.”

Members from GCC’s MEChA Club will set up games to celebrate this event.

 

Volunteer Orientation

Volunteer Orientation

Free Arts for Abused Children of Arizona

Free Arts for Abused Children of Arizona is the only nonprofit organization in Arizona delivering creative and therapeutic arts programs to abused and homeless children, ages 3 to 21 years.  Established in 1993, Free Arts offers four distinct programs and serves more than 8,000 children annuallyWe partner with 32 child welfare agencies, spanning 100 + sites throughout Maricopa County, including group homes, crisis shelters, residential treatment facilities, and unaccompanied minor programs.  Since our inception we have provided creative healing services to more than 95,000 youth. The dedicated adult volunteers and employees of Free Arts are proud of our twenty-one year history of consistently and compassionately providing quality programs that result in changed lives for vulnerable and neglected children in our community.

Become a caring, adult role model and Free Arts volunteer today!

Volunteer Opportunities Include:

  • Mentoring a group of children at a group home, shelter, or treatment center for one hour a week through artistic expression
  • Supporting children for one day art events at places like the Phoenix Art Museum, Desert Botanical Gardens, and Arizona Opera
  • Assisting children to create, heal, learn and grow during our Summer Camp Series!

All volunteers start by attending a Volunteer Orientation.

These one hour, no obligation orientations are held each month at our office located at 103 West Highland Avenue Suite 200 in Phoenix. Join us to learn how you can give your time to Free Arts and make a difference in the lives of our community’s most vulnerable children.

Click here to learn more about Free Arts.

* Due to facility restrictions volunteers must be 18+

Official Link Provided: http://www.eventbrite.com/e/volunteer-orientation-registration-9469829515?aff=FBAPR

INFLUX Public Art Project in TEMPE, AZ

INFLUX Public Art Project in TEMPE, AZ

I’d like to announce that my ‪#‎influxaz‬ project is up -All Credits given to Casey Farina. on ‪#‎HaydenMill‬ in ‪#‎Tempe‬.‪#‎publicart‬ ‪#‎projectionmapping‬ ‪#‎raspberrypi‬ ‪#‎influxcycle6‬ ‪#‎generativeart‬‪ #‎CityofTempe‬ ‪#‎downtowntempe‬

Cascade.Erode.Construct. is a video installation that abstractly explores the history of the iconic Hayden Flour Mill. The Mill’s proximity to water (the Salt River) is an integral part of its identity as a Tempe landmark. The movement and erosive power of water form the fundamental structure of the animation from which new forms are constructed. The visual artifacts that remain on the north wall of the Mill are isolated and reinvigorated by the projected light. The animation was created by using a digital image of the wall as the input for a variety of algorithmic processes. The installation repeats every ten minutes between 8:00 PM and 1:00 AM on the north wall of the Hayden Mill. Casey’s research was facilitated by John Southard and E. Hunter Hansen in the Tempe Historic Preservation Office and Jared Smith at the Tempe History Museum.

This project was funded through the City of Tempe Municipal Arts Fund with the support of the Tempe Municipal Arts Commission.

https://vimeo.com/163623598

Thanks,

Were the Japan and Ecuador earthquakes related?

 

They may have happened within days of one another, but the devastating earthquakes in Japan had nothing to do with the strong temblor that struck Ecuador over the weekend, experts say.

Both Japan and Ecuador are located along the so-called Pacific Ring of Fire, which spans the coasts lining the Pacific Ocean. The regions along the Ring of Fire are prone to earthquakes, but it’s extremely rare for an earthquake on one side of the world to trigger earthquakes on the other, said Ross Stein, CEO and co-founder of Temblor.net, a free website and smartphone application that helps people understand locations’ seismic risk.

For one thing, the earthquakes that hit Japan are a completely different type of quake than the one that struck Ecuador, Stein said. On April 14, a magnitude-6.2 earthquake hit southern Japan, and a day later, on April 15, a magnitude-7.0 earthquake struck the same region, according to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). [The 10 Biggest Earthquakes in History]

Both of these earthquakes were strike-slip earthquakes, Stein said, which occur when two parts of the Earth’s crust slide against each other. The best way to imagine this is to place your hands together, with your fingers pointing away from your body, and slide your left hand forward and your right hand backward.

Both of these strike-slip earthquakes were shallow — about 6 to 8 miles (10 to 12 kilometers) deep — and both were destructive, killing more than 40 people in total, according to news sources. But the second quake was about 20 times stronger than the first, and released about 400,000 times more energy than the amount unleashed by the atomic bomb dropped on Nagasaki in 1945, Stein and Volkan Sevilgen, the other Temblor.net co-founder, wrote in a blog post.

These two earthquakes in Japan were likely related, Stein said. However, it’s unclear whether the magnitude-6.2 earthquake was a foreshock of the magnitude-7.0 earthquake or the magnitude-7.0 earthquake was an aftershock of the magnitude-6.2 earthquake, Stein said.

“So far, the evidence suggests that both are true,” the experts wrote in the blog post. Though it’s rare for an aftershock to be larger than the main shock, it does happen, Stein told Live Science.

Regardless, the first earthquake made the faults near it more likely to rupture, which likely helped to trigger the second, larger earthquake, Stein said.

Ecuador earthquake

On Saturday (April 16), merely a day after the second Japanese earthquake, a massive magnitude-7.8 earthquake rocked Muisne, Ecuador, the USGS reported. [Image Gallery: This Millennium’s Destructive Earthquakes]

Unlike the strike-slip earthquakes in Japan, this one was a so-called megathrust quake, which occurs when one tectonic plate jams under another. In this case, the Nazca Plate is moving under the South American continent at a rate of about 2.2 to 2.4 inches (55 to 61 millimeters) a year, Stein and Sevilgen wrote in another blog post.

More than 400 deaths have been reported from the Ecuador quake so far.

This isn’t Muisne’s first large earthquake. Another magnitude-7.8 earthquake hit almost the exact location in 1942, Stein said. In fact, given that the subduction rate is about 2.3 inches (60 mm) a year, and nearly 75 years have elapsed since the last large earthquake, it makes sense that this is a “repeat earthquake,” Stein said.

Read more at the following site… cbsnews.com

2016 RecycleMania Tournament – Final Results

RMbanner_2016

Thanks to Chaunda Fraulino and all of her hard work in making this happen every year. We have continually gotten better in this competition and I hope you all improve next year too.

Also thanks to all of you for doing your part and recycling, reducing, and reusing. This would not have been possible without an environmentally conscious student body and employees.

2016 RecycleMania Tournament
February 7 – April 2, 2016
 
Final Results
Glendale Community College (GCC) competed with 276 colleges and universities nationwide in the 2016 RecycleMania tournament from February 7 – April 2.  The four Arizona participants included Arizona State University, Glendale Community College, and the University of Arizona. GCC reduced the amount of waste per person from 8.63 lbs. in 2015 to 7.61 lbs. in 2016 earning a 3rd place finish in the 2016 Waste Minimization competition.
The goal of waste minimization is to reduce overall waste (trash plus recyclables) through waste reduction activities such as the Zero Waste Program.  As a direct result of our success in waste minimization, our placement in other categories is higher.  The final results in all categories are listed below.
2016 RecycleMania Final Results
Grand Champion
103 out of 207Per Capita Classic
249 out of 269Gorilla
222 out of 276

Waste Minimization
3 out of 114

Corrugated Cardboard
93 out of 97

Our cumulative GHG (Greenhouse Gas) Reductions during the competition are 58 Metric Tons of CO2 Equivalent, or 11 cars off the road, or the energy consumption of 5 households.
 

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About RecycleMania
This is GCC’s 6th year participating in the RecycleMania tournament.  The tournament ran from February 7 – April 2, 2016. RecycleMania is a friendly competition and benchmarking tool for college and university recycling programs to promote waste reduction activities to their campus communities. Over an 8-week period, schools report recycling and trash data which are then ranked according to who collects the largest amount of recyclables per capita, the largest amount of total recyclables, the least amount of trash per capita, or has the highest recycling rate overall.

Earth Day 1-Mile Sustainability Walk

sustwaEarth Day 1-Mile Sustainability Walk

10AM-2PM

There no better day than Earth Day to take a 15-20 minute break and enjoy the 1-Mile Sustainability Walk (see attached map).  This is a great opportunity to see our beautiful campus and learn about sustainability initiatives.