How to Make a Table Out of Pallets

One of my favorite DIY guys on the web is Shane @ Beachbumlivin because he gives entertaining, yet clear instructions for simple and cool projects that I like.  See for yourself if you want to make a coffee table for little to no out of pocket $$.

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Spirit Lines: Helen Hardin Etchings at the Heard

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Spirit Lines: Helen Hardin Etchings
Through March 6, 2016

http://heard.org/exhibits/helen-hardin-etchings/

This exhibit displays a complete body of work by one of the 20th century’s most significant artists. Spirit Lines: Helen Hardin Etchings features all 23 first editions of the Santa Clara Pueblo artist’s collection of copper plate etchings completed by the artist from 1980 to 1984. This is the first time this body of work has been assembled and shown in its entirety.

Helen Hardin (1943 – 1984) was the daughter of artist Pablita Velarde (1918 – 2006) from the Santa Clara Pueblo near Albuquerque, New Mexico. Shortly after birth Hardin was given the name Tsa-Sah-Wee-Eh, meaning Little Standing Spruce, in the Tewa language. As Helen’s father was Anglo, she was unable to participate in Pueblo ceremonies. Unlike her mother, who painted scenes of traditional Pueblo life, Hardin chose to interpret images of ancient pottery and rock art designs into contemporary, abstracted, highly individualized compositions. With the use of repeated geometric forms and layering techniques, viewers obtain a sense of introspect into a woman artist whose work is divided between traditional and modern worlds. Through her groundbreaking career, Hardin created avenues for other Native women to break from traditionalism.

Astronomy, Photography, Earth and Mars in Harmony

Take a journey with Steve Strom, astronomer and photographer based in Tucson, and his contrasting photos of Earth and Mars which are striking in their similarities.  The short film by Arizona Public Media was well worth five minutes of my time.  I’m impressed!

The Art and Science of Earth and Mars

Published on Nov 23, 2015 by Arizona Public Media (5.31 mins)

Earth and Mars were formed at the same time, 3.5 to 4 billion years ago. Yet cosmic forces left one wet and lush and the other dry and barren. Local astronomer and photographer Steve Strom has authored a book that invites readers to contemplate the differences and similarities of these two adjacent planets.

For more information about Steve Strom and his newly published book Sand Mirrors, click here:  http://www.stephenstrom.com/

 

 

 

 

Makerspaces and Meetups in Phoenix

Looking for a makerspace or group in the Valley?  Here is a great place to get started finding inspiration and like-minded creative spirits.

http://makerspaces.meetup.com/cities/us/az/phoenix/

The Power and Promise of Today’s Youth

TEDx: Influential teenagers from around world meet in London

http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-35332882

Young entertainers, entrepreneurs and inventors from around the world have gathered in London to try to inspire Britain’s next generation.

It’s part of the teenage version of the annual TEDx event, which brings together leading figures in technology, education and design.

 

U.S. increasingly challenged by advances in R&D and S&T

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United States increasingly challenged by advances in RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT and SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY

  • The United States invests the most in research and development (R&D), produces the most advanced degrees in science and engineering and high-impact scientific publications, and remains the largest provider of information, financial, and business services. However, Southeast, South, and East Asia continue to rapidly ascend in many aspects of S&E. The region now accounts for 40 percent of global R&D, with China as the stand-out as it continues to strengthen its global S&E capacity.

“Indicators is a rich source of information on a wide range of measures that let us know how the United States is performing in science and technology,” said NSF Director France Córdova. “It gives us crucial information on how we compare to other nations in the areas of research and development, STEM education, and the development of our workforce. The report also provides state-level comparisons, insights into the representation of women and minorities in science and engineering, and insight into what the public thinks about science.”

  • The 2016 edition of Indicators highlights that China, South Korea and India are investing heavily in R&D and in developing a well-educated workforce skilled in science and engineering. Indicators 2016 makes it clear that while the United States continues to lead in a variety of metrics, it exists in an increasingly multi-polar world for S&E that revolves around the creation and use of knowledge and technology.

 

  • China is now the second-largest performer of R&D, accounting for 20 percent of global R&D as compared to the United States, which accounts for 27 percent.

 

  • China is also playing an increasingly prominent role in knowledge and technology-intensive industries, including high-tech manufacturing and knowledge-intensive services. These industries account for 29 percent of global Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and for nearly 40 percent of U.S. GDP. China ranks second in high-tech manufacturing, where the U.S. maintains a slim lead with a global share of 29 percent to China’s 27 percent. It has now surpassed Japan to move into third place behind the United States and the European Union.

 

  • China is the world’s number-one producer of undergraduates with degrees in science and engineering. These fields account for 49 percent of all bachelor’s degrees awarded in China, compared to 33 percent of all bachelor’s degrees the U.S. awards.

 

  • In 2012, students in China earned about 23 percent of the world’s 6 million first university degrees in S&E. Students in the European Union earned about 12 percent and those in the U.S. accounted for about 9 percent of these degrees.

 

  •  However, the U.S. continues to award the largest number of S&E doctorates and remains the destination of choice for internationally mobile students.

 

“Decreased federal investment is negatively impacting our nation’s research universities,” said Kelvin Droegemeier, NSB vice chair and vice president for research at the University of Oklahoma. “Our universities conduct 51 percent of the nation’s basic research and train the next generation of STEM-capable workers. Federal support is essential to developing the new knowledge and human capital that allows the U.S. to innovate and be at the forefront of S&T.”

  • Americans have generally favorable views toward science, believing that science creates more opportunity for the next generation, that its benefits outweigh its risks, and that the federal government should provide funds for scientific research.

 

Additionally, despite declining public confidence in most U.S. institutions, Americans’ confidence in the scientific community remains strong. However, Americans take a dim view of our nation’s performance in K-12 science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education; most believe other countries are doing a better job. About half of Americans worry that science is making life “change too fast,” up from about one-third who expressed this concern a decade ago.

  • Americans remain divided on global warming.
  • However, a majority of Americans say they would prefer a focus on alternative energy sources over fossil fuel development.
  • Eight out of ten say they would like to see more emphasis on fuel efficiency standards for vehicles and renewable energy development.

 

“Our country’s commitment to investing in R&D and in our higher education institutions has and continues to fuel our success,” said NSB chair Arvizu. “Other countries are emulating our model. We can view these advancements as opportunities for our global society to tackle complex problems, such as energy demands, food and water security, and disease. At the same time, we need to remain steadfast in our nation’s dedication to that which has served us so well: investing in people and their ideas.”

About Indicators

Science and Engineering Indicators is the most comprehensive source of high-quality federal data on a wide range of topics that include trends in global R&D investments and knowledge-intensive production, K-12 and postsecondary STEM education, workforce trends and composition, state level comparisons, and public attitudes and understanding of science and related issues. Other, related resources include the Indicators Digest, state data tool, STEM education interactive online resource, and NSB’s 2015 report, Revisiting the STEM Workforce.

To read the entire article, click here!